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 17/02/2020 Tlaxcala, the international network of translators for linguistic diversity Tlaxcala's Manifesto  
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 CULTURE & COMMUNICATION 
CULTURE & COMMUNICATION / The dark psychology of docial networks
Why it feels like everything is going haywire
Date of publication at Tlaxcala: 01/02/2020
Translations available: فارسی 

The dark psychology of docial networks
Why it feels like everything is going haywire

Various Authors - Autores varios - Auteurs divers- AAVV-d.a.

 

Story by and

A few right-wing social-media platforms have enabled the most reviled ideology of the 20th century to draw in young men hungry for a sense of meaning and belonging and willing to give Nazism a second chance. Left-leaning young adults, in contrast, seem to be embracing socialism and even, in some cases, communism with an enthusiasm that at times seems detached from the history of the 20th century. And polling suggests that young people across the political spectrum are losing faith in democracy.

Suppose that the biblical story of Creation were true: God created the universe in six days, including all the laws of physics and all the physical constants that apply throughout the universe. Now imagine that one day, in the early 21st century, God became bored and, just for fun, doubled the gravitational constant. What would it be like to live through such a change? We’d all be pulled toward the floor; many buildings would collapse; birds would fall from the sky; the Earth would move closer to the sun, reestablishing orbit in a far hotter zone.

Let’s rerun this thought experiment in the social and political world, rather than the physical one. The U.S. Constitution was an exercise in intelligent design. The Founding Fathers knew that most previous democracies had been unstable and short-lived. But they were excellent psychologists, and they strove to create institutions and procedures that would work with human nature to resist the forces that had torn apart so many other attempts at self-governance.

For example, in “Federalist No. 10,” James Madison wrote about his fear of the power of “faction,” by which he meant strong partisanship or group interest that “inflamed [men] with mutual animosity” and made them forget about the common good. He thought that the vastness of the United States might offer some protection from the ravages of factionalism, because it would be hard for anyone to spread outrage over such a large distance. Madison presumed that factious or divisive leaders “may kindle a flame within their particular States, but will be unable to spread a general conflagration through the other States.” The Constitution included mechanisms to slow things down, let passions cool, and encourage reflection and deliberation.

Madison’s design has proved durable. But what would happen to American democracy if, one day in the early 21st century, a technology appeared that—over the course of a decade—changed several fundamental parameters of social and political life? What if this technology greatly increased the amount of “mutual animosity” and the speed at which outrage spread? Might we witness the political equivalent of buildings collapsing, birds falling from the sky, and the Earth moving closer to the sun?

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Courtesy of The Atlantic
Source: https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2019/12/social-media-democracy/600763/
Publication date of original article: 31/12/2019
URL of this page : http://www.tlaxcala-int.org/article.asp?reference=27981

 

Tags: Social mediaFacebookTwitterFake NewsAltrightGAFAAltrightUSA
 

 
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