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ABYA YALA / Colombia's Israel connection: Peacemaking and the Peace Prize
Date of publication at Tlaxcala: 12/10/2016
Translations available: Español 

Colombia's Israel connection: Peacemaking and the Peace Prize

Samer Badawi سامر بدوي

 

If the Nobel committee sought to move the needle on Colombian peace by honoring one of its auteurs, they might do well to remember a similar experiment that is all-too-familiar to observers in the Middle East.

Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos and then Israeli President Shimon Peres in Jerusalem, June 10, 2013. (Mark Neyman/GPO)

Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos and then Israeli President Shimon Peres in Jerusalem, June 10, 2013. On this occasion they signed a free trade agreement between Israel and Colombia (Mark Neyman/GPO)

 

This year’s Nobel Peace Prize, which went to Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos “for his resolute efforts to bring [Colombia’s] more than 50-year-long civil war to an end,” is being portrayed by some as a potential counterbalance to the October 2 referendum in which Colombians narrowly voted down a peace deal between the government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC.

Reacting to the Nobel decision, Colombian journalist Carlos Arturo Charria, a columnist for El Espectador newspaper, told +972 by email that he hopes the prize pushes half of his country “to come out of its hate and misinformation” and support the peace deal.

It’s a laudable aim for a prize that, in 1973, went to none other than Henry Kissinger. But the Nobel Peace Prize Committee’s decision may instead speak to a fundamental misreading of the dynamics of protracted conflict.

If the Nobel Committee sought to move the needle on Colombian peace by honoring one of its auteurs, they might do well to remember a similar experiment that is all-too-familiar to observers in the Middle East. It was in 1994, after all, that the peace prize went to Yasser Arafat, Shimon Peres, and Yitzhak Rabin “for their efforts to create peace in the Middle East.”

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Courtesy of +972 Magazine
Source: http://972mag.com/colombias-israel-connection-peacemaking-and-the-peace-prize/122511/
Publication date of original article: 08/10/2016
URL of this page : http://www.tlaxcala-int.org/article.asp?reference=19114

 

Tags: SantosShimon PeresNobel Peace PrizePalestine/IsraelColombia-IsraelDirty war
 

 
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